A year ago I stepped away from what might very well be my last full-time role in an organization. My decision to start consulting wasn’t part of a long-term goal or something I considered in depth before leaving my last job. It was a leap I made in hopes of relieving the crushing pressure I felt as a young Black person in the nonprofit sector. I didn’t know exactly what I was getting into with consulting but I did know that the mental, physical, and emotional toll of making space for myself as a Black woman, trying to make space for others, and doing my job, all while being underpaid, was too much.

Read full blog at https://www.graceanderson.co/writing/chipping-away-from-the-outside-a-one-year-reflection-on-consulting

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Many in the nonprofit sector have long questioned and vocalizedthe unsustainable, racist, and capitalist nature of the field. And while the non-profit sector isn’t unlike other sectors, it is perceived to operate differently. There is a perception that nonprofits operate with a stronger moral compass, without ego, and an obligation to center those most impacted. Black Youth Project captures this sentiment perfectly in the 2020 article How nonprofits gaslight you into the same self-sacrificing work as capitalist corporations, “Sadly, nonprofits often operate similarly, but the nefarious difference lies under the cloak of being “community-focused” or “progressive”; post-onboarding, a constant gaslighting ensues.”

Read more: https://www.graceanderson.co/writing/turning-away-from-what-no-longer-serves-us-in-the-non-profit-sector

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As a young Black woman in the environmental field, I was swiftly engulfed by the promise and obligation of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) work. I wanted to make space for myself and others in the field so, it felt like I needed to say yes to every opportunity to share my experience and educate people. And now, after 10 years of working in the field and still hearing the question, “Do Black people even go outside?” — I can’t help but rage at the machine DEI work has become. I’ve observed countless instances of DEI work replicating and reinforcing the very toxic and oppressive systems that it is intended to challenge.

Read full article here.

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At the summit of Pingora on Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapaho land.

Philanthropy isn’t a radical act. Redistributing wealth acquired through exploitation, greed, racism, and tax evasion isn’t radical. Often, instead of creating abundance and fostering innovation, philanthropists exacerbate competition and manufacture scarcity by forcing competition for limited funding, which is ultimately distributed inequitably. Abolishing the systems that allow for gross wealth inequalities and resource hoarding would be radical. Guaranteeing a basic income, providing living wages, and ensuring access to safe and affordable housing and healthcare for all would be radical.

Alas, here we are, in the interim. Using this inequitable apparatus to return money to systematically under-resourced communities where it should have been in the first place.

Read the full article at https://www.graceanderson.co/writing/philanthropy-needs-to-fund-dreamspace-for-black-folks

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